The Sea Wolf

Jack LONDON (1876 - 1917)

The Sea-Wolf is a novel written in 1904 by American author Jack London. An immediate bestseller, the first printing of forty thousand copies was sold out before publication. Of it, Ambrose Bierce wrote "The great thing—and it is among the greatest of things—is that tremendous creation, Wolf Larsen... the hewing out and setting up of such a figure is enough for a man to do in one lifetime." (Summary by Wikipedia)

Genre(s): Action & Adventure Fiction, General Fiction, Nautical & Marine Fiction

Language: English

Section Chapter Reader Time
Play 01 01: I scarcely know where to begin Tom Crawford
00:19:39
Play 02 02: I seemed swinging in a a mighty Tom Crawford
00:19:08
Play 03 03: Wolf Larsen ceased swearing Tom Crawford
00:26:19
Play 04 04: What happened to me next Tom Crawford
00:16:10
Play 05 05: But my first night in the hunters' steerage Tom Crawford
00:18:48
Play 06 06: By the following morning the storm Tom Crawford
00:33:17
Play 07 07: At last, after three days of variable wind Tom Crawford
00:08:23
Play 08 08: Sometimes I think Wolf Larsen mad Tom Crawford
00:17:42
Play 09 09: Three days of rest, three blessed days Tom Crawford
00:21:26
Play 10 10: My intimacy with Wolf Larsen increases Tom Crawford
00:16:27
Play 11 11: The Ghost has attained the southernmost point Tom Crawford
00:15:03
Play 12 12: The last twenty-four hours have witnessed Tom Crawford
00:24:17
Play 13 13: For three days I did my own work, and Thomas Tom Crawford
00:10:06
Play 14 14: It has dawned upon me that I have never Tom Crawford
00:18:42
Play 15 15: There was a deal of cursing and groaning Tom Crawford
00:13:48
Play 16 16: I cannot say that the position of mate Tom Crawford
00:17:25
Play 17 17: Strange to say, in spite of the general foreboding, Tom Crawford
00:32:54
Play 18 18: The next day, while the storm was blowing itself out Tom Crawford
00:16:53
Play 19 19: I came on deck to find the Ghost heading up close Tom Crawford
00:15:15
Play 20 20: The remainder of the day passed uneventfully. Tom Crawford
00:18:23
Play 21 21: The chagrin Wolf Larsen felt from being ignored Tom Crawford
00:11:05
Play 22 22: I knew what it was as she came toward me. Tom Crawford
00:08:29
Play 23 23: Brave winds, blowing fair, swiftly drove the Ghost Tom Crawford
00:12:22
Play 24 24: Among the most vivid memories of my life Tom Crawford
00:15:57
Play 25 25: "You've been on deck, Mr. Van Weyden," Tom Crawford
00:30:35
Play 26 26: Wolf Larsen took the distribution of the whiskey Tom Crawford
00:30:55
Play 27 27: Day broke, grey and chill. Tom Crawford
00:18:12
Play 28 28: There is no need of going into Tom Crawford
00:16:36
Play 29 29: "Fool!" I cried aloud in my vexation. Tom Crawford
00:13:09
Play 30 30: No wonder we called it Endeavour Island. Tom Crawford
00:17:37
Play 31 31: "It will smell," I said, "but it will keep in the heat Tom Crawford
00:06:33
Play 32 32: I awoke, oppressed by a mysterious sensation. Tom Crawford
00:19:22
Play 33 33: We waited all day for Wolf Larsen to come ashore. Tom Crawford
00:14:20
Play 34 34: "It's too bad the Ghost has lost her masts. Tom Crawford
00:12:08
Play 35 35: Next day, the mast-steps clear, and everything in readiness, Tom Crawford
00:15:03
Play 36 36: For two days Maud and I ranged the sea Tom Crawford
00:22:06
Play 37 37: At once we moved aboard the Ghost, Tom Crawford
00:20:43
Play 38 38: "I think my left side is going," Wolf Larsen wrote, Tom Crawford
00:07:38
Play 39 39: The day came for our departure. Tom Crawford
00:16:34