<![CDATA[Canterbury Tales, The by CHAUCER, Geoffrey]]> The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). The tales, some of which are originals and others not, are contained inside a frame tale and told by a group of pilgrims on their way from Southwark to Canterbury to visit the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.

The themes of the tales vary, and include topics such as courtly love, treachery, and avarice. The genres also vary, and include romance, Breton lai, sermon, beast fable, and fabliau. The characters, introduced in the General Prologue of the book, tell tales of great cultural relevance. The version read here was edited by D. Laing Purves (1838-1873) “for popular perusal” and the language is mostly updated. (Summary by Wikipedia/Gesine)

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LibriVox The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). The tales, some of which are originals and others not, are contained inside a frame tale and told by a group of pilgrims on their way from Southwark to Canterbury to visit the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.

The themes of the tales vary, and include topics such as courtly love, treachery, and avarice. The genres also vary, and include romance, Breton lai, sermon, beast fable, and fabliau. The characters, introduced in the General Prologue of the book, tell tales of great cultural relevance. The version read here was edited by D. Laing Purves (1838-1873) “for popular perusal” and the language is mostly updated. (Summary by Wikipedia/Gesine)

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LibriVox info@librivox.org <![CDATA[Preface]]> No No <![CDATA[The Life of Geoffrey Chaucer]]> No No <![CDATA[The General Prologue]]> No No <![CDATA[The Knight’s Tale, Part 1]]> No No <![CDATA[The Knight's Tale, Part 2]]> No No <![CDATA[The Miller's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Reeve's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Cook's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Men of Law's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Wife of Bath's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Friar's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Sompnour's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Clerk's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Merchant's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Squire's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Franklin's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Doctor's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Pardoner's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Shipman's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Prioress's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Tale of Sir Thopas]]> No No <![CDATA[Chaucer’s Tale of Meliboeus]]> No No <![CDATA[The Monk's Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Nun’s Priest’s Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Second Nun’s Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Canons Yeoman’s Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Manciple’s Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[The Parson’s Tale]]> No No <![CDATA[Preces de Chauceres]]> No No