<![CDATA[Unspoken Sermons by MACDONALD, George]]>
MacDonald's theology, though sprinkled liberally throughout his fairly substantial number of books, is perhaps nowhere more palpable than in Unspoken Sermons. These sermons, though by no means amongst the most popular of MacDonald's work, have had theological impact from their first appearance. That influence is probably most notable in C.S. Lewis who called MacDonald "my master" and of Unspoken Sermons said, "My own debt to this book is almost as great as one man can owe to another."

More recent influence can be seen in Michael Phillips' 2005 edited edition of some of Macdonald's sermons in which he states:
"MacDonald saw things differently. Doctrinal formula was nothing to him. His unique perspective takes some getting used to. I find that many passages require two or three readings. But I also find spiritual gold awaiting me, sometimes buried deep but always ready to shine out brilliantly from the page when suddenly I see it. Theologically, too, as imaginatively, I have discovered many doors of delight opening before me into new worlds of wonder about God and his work." (Summary by David Baldwin)

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LibriVox
MacDonald's theology, though sprinkled liberally throughout his fairly substantial number of books, is perhaps nowhere more palpable than in Unspoken Sermons. These sermons, though by no means amongst the most popular of MacDonald's work, have had theological impact from their first appearance. That influence is probably most notable in C.S. Lewis who called MacDonald "my master" and of Unspoken Sermons said, "My own debt to this book is almost as great as one man can owe to another."

More recent influence can be seen in Michael Phillips' 2005 edited edition of some of Macdonald's sermons in which he states:
"MacDonald saw things differently. Doctrinal formula was nothing to him. His unique perspective takes some getting used to. I find that many passages require two or three readings. But I also find spiritual gold awaiting me, sometimes buried deep but always ready to shine out brilliantly from the page when suddenly I see it. Theologically, too, as imaginatively, I have discovered many doors of delight opening before me into new worlds of wonder about God and his work." (Summary by David Baldwin)

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LibriVox info@librivox.org <![CDATA[01 - The Child in the Midst]]> No No <![CDATA[02 - The Consuming Fire]]> No No <![CDATA[03 - The Higher Faith]]> No No <![CDATA[04 - It Shall Not Be Forgiven]]> No No <![CDATA[05 - The New Name]]> No No <![CDATA[06 - The Heart with the Treasure]]> No No <![CDATA[07 - The Temptation in the Wilderness]]> No No <![CDATA[08 - The Eloi]]> No No <![CDATA[09 - The Hands of the Father]]> No No <![CDATA[10 - Love Thy Neighbour]]> No No <![CDATA[11 - Love Thine Enemy]]> No No <![CDATA[12 - The God of the Living]]> No No <![CDATA[13 - The Way]]> No No <![CDATA[14 - The Hardness of the Way]]> No No <![CDATA[15 - The Cause of Spiritual Stupidity]]> No No <![CDATA[16 - The Word of Jesus on Prayer]]> No No <![CDATA[17 - Man's Difficulty Concerning Prayer]]> No No <![CDATA[18 - The Last Farthing]]> No No <![CDATA[19 - Abba, Father]]> No No <![CDATA[20 - Life]]> No No <![CDATA[21 - The Fear of God]]> No No <![CDATA[22 - The Voice of Job]]> No No <![CDATA[23 - Self Denial]]> No No <![CDATA[24 - The Truth in Jesus]]> No No <![CDATA[25 - The Creation In Christ]]> No No <![CDATA[26 - The Knowing of the Son]]> No No <![CDATA[27 - The Mirrors of the Lord]]> No No <![CDATA[28 - The Truth]]> No No <![CDATA[29 - Freedom]]> No No <![CDATA[30 - Kingship]]> No No <![CDATA[31 - Justice]]> No No <![CDATA[32 - Light]]> No No <![CDATA[33 - The Displeasure of Jesus]]> No No <![CDATA[34 - Righteousness]]> No No <![CDATA[35 - The Final Unmasking]]> No No <![CDATA[36 - The Inheritance]]> No No