May, 2014

Nerds and Geeks

Posted on May 1, 2014 by | Posted in about LibriVox, Blog, Books, For Volunteers, Monthly Picks, News | Comments: Comments Off

The 25th of May denotes International Geek Pride Day – what better way to celebrate that than with 10 gems from our catalog!

Nerds and geeks are rarely the center of a party. Nowadays it’s easy to stay connected without leaving the house, but when William Wordsworth penned his poem, it meant something when you were The Recluse.

Shut up in a room decorated only with white sheets, is how Chester Kent solves The Secret of Lonesome Cove. And that, although the case of a “drowned” woman in the novel by Samuel Hopkins Adams takes odd turns every few days…

Equally odd turns takes the life of Trilby, who virtually over night becomes a famous singer. However, this is only because she has been hypnotised by Svengali, a music geek… Read George du Maurier’s novel to find out if her secret will ever be revealed.

Tex has no secret, he is just happens to be awfully good at poker. But then, why is the PSI Lodge after him to unveil his Card Trick? John Berryman’s lighthearted story shows people with powers nobody has ever heard of before.

When Marie Curie started working on her thesis, she was not the first to discover Radioactive Substances. But she was the first to discover Radium and Polonium, and, subsequently, the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize in science.

H. G. Wells wrote the story about the scientist who invented The Time Machine. The man used it to explore humankind’s future up to the year 802.701 – where he promptly stumbled upon a war and had to choose sides…

Dr. Thomas Stockmann stands on his own side after he has been declared An Enemy of the People. A hot spring has been discoverd, but Stockmann says the water is contaminated and cannot be used. Which side will win in Henrik Ibsen’s drama – caution or commerce?

It is clear where Henry Ford stands: His invention of the asssembly line and the automation that followed shaped how large industries are working until today. A description of how he did it can be found in his memoirs My Life and My Work.

Friedrich Kerst
writes about a genius of a different realm. His biography of Mozart: The Man and the Artist as Revealed in His Own Words, makes use of letters that have been written throughout his life by the famous musician himself.

Not all ingenuity is used for the advancement of society. A highly intelligent woman is the head of the secret Brotherhood of the Seven Kings, and their access to new scientific resources only heightens their threat to the people of London. Read the book by L. T. Meade and Robert Eustache to find out more.

Enjoy – and don’t forget where your towel is!

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